TribalCats Maine Coon Cattery in SC



Home
Available Kittens Page 1
Our Breeding Males (Updated 2/27/16)
Our Breeding Females (updated 6/24/17)
Youngsters-updated 9/15/17
ADOPTIONS updated 9/11/17
Show Quality Kittens (updated 12/29/15)
Contact Us
Oldestage Tonto of TribalCats HCM Test Results

Veterinary Cardiac Genetics Laboratory

PO Box 605, Pullman, WA 99163-0605

509-335-6038 • FAX: 509-335-3745 • vcgl@vetmed.wsu.edu

EVALUATION FOR THE FELINE HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY

CARDIAC MYOSIN BINDING PROTEIN C MUTATION

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common form of heart disease in the cat. In many breeds it is an inherited disease. Our laboratory has identified a mutation responsible for the gene in some cats. However, it should be noted that in human beings with the same disease, there are many different genetic mutations which can cause this disease. It is likely the same in the cat.

Very importantly, the absence of the mutation in this cat DOES NOT mean that it will never develop the disease. It means that it does not have the only known mutation that can cause the disease in the cat at this time. In the future, additional mutations may be identified that may be tested for as well.

Cats that are positive for the test will not necessarily develop significant heart disease and die from the disease. Some cats will develop a very mild form of the disease and will live quite comfortably. We recommend annual evaluation by an echocardiogram and discussion with a veterinarian for treatment options if hypertrophy develops.

Importantly, breeding decisions should be made carefully. At this time we have observed about 35% Maine Coon cats that we have tested carry at least one copy of the gene. Removal of all of these cats from the breeding population could be very bad for the Maine Coon breed. Remember that HCM affected cats also carry other important good genes that we do not want to lose from the breed. We recommend not breeding the homozygous cats and, if needed, breeding heterozygotes to unaffected cats to decrease the risk of producing affected cats. As we move forward we should try to select more and more negative kittens from these lines to use for breeding. Keep in mind that we are continually learning about this disease and recommendations will be altered as we obtain more information.

Date: August 30, 2006

Cat Name: Oldestage Tonto of Tribalcats

Cat Breed: Maine Coon

Microchip Number (optional):

Owner Name: Valerie Walter

The results of this test are:

Negative for the HCM mutation

Kathryn M. Meurs, DVM, PhD, Professor

Richard L. Ott Chair of Small Animal Medicine and Research

Washington State University- College of Veterinary Medicine